Something super…

I’ve been pretty proud of all the things I’ve managed to do since returning to ballet, especially since I never thought most of it was possible…

There was my brief teaching stint (I still miss that).

And there was the whole getting back on pointe thing (part accomplishment, part foolishness!).

I always wanted to perform in a full-length ballet and I’ve got, what, 7 of those under my belt now?

I’ve done some “summer intensives” (okay, not at the same level as teenagers, but still!).

There aren’t too many ballet dreams left unfulfilled at this point.

Except…

Okay, who among us balletophiles hasn’t attended a professional production and thought, gee, how cool would it be to be on stage with them?

Of course since my ballet skillz are firmly amateur despite years of work I know that I’m not going to be getting a contract to dance with a professional company, but…

You do know that some of those story ballets need human scenery, right? The non-dancing villagers or guards or whatever who occupy space and fill out the story… known in the ballet (and opera, too, I think) world as “supernumeraries” or (since that’s such a mouthful) just “supers.” They’re what the extras are to film.

Well, it just so happens that my favorite local big name ballet company put out a casting call last month for their fall production. They were looking for “fit” dancers who would be comfortable appearing on stage in midriff-baring tops. Well… I’ve done that before, albeit on a much smaller stage, so why the heck not give it a go?

So I auditioned!

Scary!

The only auditions I’ve ever done were for the studio shows, which is a whole other kettle of fish. Nerve-wracking, but you know what to expect and the people doing the casting know what you’re capable of even if you flub whatever it is they’ve asked of you. But this audition involves going to a place with a bunch of people you don’t know and being judged solely on whatever you do in that studio at that time… and with no inkling beforehand of what they’re even going to want you to do.

On the plus side, if you screw up, you get to return to anonymity and you haven’t humiliated yourself in front of all your friends.

So, the audition. We were told to wear comfortable yet form-fitting workout/yoga type clothes. Thus, true to form, I was out the night before looking for some sort of attractive workout attire since ballet is the only exercise I attempt to look presentable for, therefore I have cute leotards in spades, but anything else workout-geared is generally ratty, faded and will only serve to make me look like Queen of the Frumps. But, of course, one can’t look as though she’s trying too hard to look cute. Ugh, this auditioning is hard work and I haven’t even started yet!

The next day after work I go over to the company’s headquarters, change, and head upstairs to the big fancy studio where all the Important Things Happen to check in with the stage manager lady who wrangles the supers. She checks off my name, has me find my name tag in the pile, and gives me a form to fill out and take to the costume fitter people.

Next I head over to the fitters and give them my form. They measure me in 20 different directions (including my head circumference) and ask about my bra size and shoe size, take my mug shot, and send me off to wait for the audition to begin. No major humiliations so far.

Since I was there about half an hour before the audition time I had plenty of time to wait and people-watch. I saw a few faces I recognized from various BBS events (master classes and the summer program) and a lot more that I didn’t know. But from eavesdropping it seemed that there was a core contingent of super regulars who have done other shows. They all seemed very friendly, so that’s a relief! Also, I happened to be near the door to the studio and realized that I my favorite principal dancer was rehearsing while we were waiting. Squee!

The men were called in first. There were maybe 12-15 guys in all? Ages seemed to range from 20s to 60s. From what I could tell they all stood in a line and chatted for a bit with the powers that be, then that was it. Well, gee, okay then! This may be the easiest audition ever if that’s all it takes!

After the guys left we got the word to go in. Our line was much longer than the guys… I’d guess there were more like 30-35 of us? They started talking to us and I realized that the man doing the casting was the choreographer himself. WHAT?! Somehow I expected some sort of minion doing the casting. I mean, a very expert minion, of course, like a ballet master or mistress or something, but not the guy who actually choreographed the whole thing! He was accompanied by the assistant artistic director who didn’t say much, but spent most of the time furiously writing on a clipboard. No pressure. Nope, none at all.

The choreographer gave us a very short spiel on what he was looking for which, to be honest, I could barely hear. Then he split us into two groups and sent us off to opposite sides of the room. Then he asked that six people at a time run part-way across the floor, stop, look back, and then continue running off stage. The first group ran across and he called out two people to go stand next to the piano. The next group ran; one woman was called out to join the piano crew. Then it was our group. We ran… and he was all “stop, stop, stop!!!” Crap, what? “You are running too balletically! Just run normally!” Oh… damn. But hilarious at the same time. I mean, here we are auditioning for a part in a ballet and being told to stop acting like we’re dancers. We went back and tried again, and… he asked me to join the group by the piano! He continued this with all the other groups, then had those of us who had been pulled aside to stand. I think there were eight of us in all. Then he had us each go and sit on the prop bed and look, I don’t know, relaxed? sultry? something? It was a bit odd, but okay, we’re auditioning for a harem role, so not that odd! Then they had the remaining people run across the floor again.

And… that was it! They told us they had made notes and would be in touch. Hm. Okay.

All in all not a terrible audition experience even though I didn’t quite know what to make of it. I hoped that getting pulled aside meant good things, but didn’t want to count my chickens before they hatched.

And so… I waited.

For what seemed an eternity.

But in reality was only about 9 days.

And then I got an e-mail from the stage manager.

And…

I was cast!

Yippee!!!

So that’s all the news I have for now, but I’m terribly excited to actually get to take part (however small) in a professional ballet production. I’ll keep you posted!

What’s in a name?

Well, hey there, Boston Ballet! A few years ago the story was all about cuts to the company, but this year… 71 dancers between the two companies?! Wow!

Exciting times on Clarendon Street, to be sure.

If you read down to the end of the end of the article, though, you’ll find what I felt to be a very interesting piece of semantics. The “corps de ballet” will now be called “artists of the company.” While I’m not sure that “corps” is a derogatory term, there is definitely a sense that it’s the entry-level position in a company (ignoring the second company… they’re more like interns) and if you’re still kicking around at that level after a couple years than you either aren’t very talented or you’re a slacker who does the minimum to stay on. And if you’ve seen these dancers you know that’s hardly ever the case.

Of course, there are only so many spaces in the second soloist, soloist, and principal levels and not everyone is going to make it there. Heck, not everyone wants to make it there. If you’ve listened to any of Kathryn Morgan’s recent podcasts she comments on some of the unexpected differences between being a member of the corps and being a soloist (at NYCB). Corps members can get opportunities to dance soloist and (maybe, occasionally) principal roles, in addition to corps work, giving a dancer a TON of opportunities to… well, DANCE! While the promotion means having to work under more intense scrutiny, the quantity of work drops off. Depending on your aspirations, that might not be a positive thing.

During the ASDP we had a Q&A session with BB company dancers Sarah Wroth (corps) and Corina Gill (just promoted to second soloist) and Corina said that part of the reason she wanted to get promoted was the knowledge that if she didn’t she couldn’t continue meeting the physical demands of corps work. She’d had some major injuries and her body wouldn’t last if she had to keep dancing every single show. How Sarah Wroth has done it — including a majorly impressive prenatal run (I think she danced most of Nutcracker season until 18 weeks, had her baby around May, and was back on stage in October) — for 13ish years? Well, I definitely give her mad props. I’m sure a lot of people look at her and wonder why she’s still doing this, but from hearing her talk a couple times it seems like she is totally satisfied with her career trajectory, and I’m sure that while she’s still “just in the corps” she has a major leadership presence in the company due to her longevity and experience.

So maybe recognizing that all the dancers, regardless of rank, are truly artists… not such a bad thing. Will anyone notice? Will it change anyone’s perception about the majority of company dancers or of ballet in general? Hard to say, but it’s a thoughtful change on Mikko Nissinen’s part nonetheless.

ASDP16 – The Review

So… year 3 of BBS’s ASDP is in the books. It was kind of a tough year, both for the program and for me personally. Lots going on in my life that kind of distracted me from the task at hand and I’m not sure if I got as much out of it as I did in years past and lots of changes going on at BBS that made it a bit chaotic.

However… there were some great aspects.

First off was the optional enrichment session. This year we chose our enrichment option for each week. We had a choice between modern or the new conditioning program, so we could do all one or the other or one week of each. I chose conditioning the first week and, though tempted by modern, felt that I wanted to continue on the conditioning path. So I’m not sure how the modern program went (though it seemed well-attended), but I liked the cross-training aspect. It was designed by a trainer who has worked extensively with the company dancers and the pre-pro students, but has a pretty diverse clientele and background. A lot of what we did focused on dynamic stretching, core strengthening, and balance. It wasn’t quite as crippling as I expected and I did learn some exercises I could carry with me. The trainer has his own studio in the area and I’d love to learn more about what he does and continue training. Actually, what I’d really like to do is learn from him how to train other dancers. There are so many myths and misinformation passed around in dance (especially ballet) circles about how to train/stretch/work that need to be corrected and I’d love to be part of that. Food for thought.

As for our technique classes… well, each year I’ve waffled about whether to take class at the intermediate or advanced level. The past two years I stuck with intermediate and signed up for it again this year. The first day one of the dancers I know from prior years saw me in the hall beforehand and we chatted a bit about levels. She had also signed up for intermediate but was considering advanced and we had a lot of similar thoughts on the topic. After our technique class that day she came up to me and said that she was ready for a change and thought that I should bump up, too. And to be honest I was feeling like it was time, myself. So after our allegro and pirouettes workshop (with the advanced level) that evening I asked the teacher whether it would be appropriate to switch. He not only agreed but said that the current enrollment in advanced was pretty puny, so it would help to even out the numbers a bit. A few of us ended up moving up, actually, though it was still a fairly small class… around 12 people most days.

I didn’t feel like the advanced level was particularly more challenging than intermediate, though I suppose there was more of an expectation that students had a familiarity with the material. I felt like I was pretty middle-of-the-road in terms of ability, which was good. Overall some good classes, though I felt that we were lacking in the amount of hands-on instruction that I’d been accustomed to in the past. This might be related to the particular teachers we had this year. Some do more of the walking around and poking, others prefer to give a combination and stay at the front of the room watching. I know which method I generally prefer, so I missed getting the in-depth instruction, but maybe that’s part of being in the advanced level… the assumption that you know what you need to work on? Not sure. No major revelations to report from technique class, but of course it’s always great to get daily classes in.

For the last part of the evening (other than that first day with the workshop I mentioned above) we generally had rep or variations, both of which were from Giselle, Act I. We only did the variation two days and we did not present this at the end as we had last year. I didn’t mind terribly, since it was a variation that involved a lot of use of the stage and those are always hard to perform en masse, but I did feel like we blasted through the choreography and I never really got it. I should’ve studied Natalia Osipova a bit more, I suppose:

Our rep was the friends piece. Since the intermediate and advanced levels were combined we did end up having to split into two casts to perform this piece. It was slightly less exhausting than the endless ballonés from last year’s Sleeping Beauty rep, with the biggest challenge coming from trying to stay in neat lines and formations. The performance at the end went off better than expected, even if the prep work did resemble an attempt at herding cats!

Our one “special” event was a Q&A with Corina Gill and Sarah Wroth which went over great. It was very informal, with Sarah kind of leading the event, but there were some great questions and I enjoyed hearing from both of them.

My overall impressions of the two weeks were… well, that I certainly hope they have plans to name a new Head of Adult Programming, because I was feeling the lack of anyone being in charge. There was no constant reassuring presence as in previous years and I think everyone’s experience would have been enhanced by someone taking charge. Even the faculty seemed frazzled and it left me wondering whether I’ll bother to spend the money next year or look to find something else. But I’m glad I went back and got to dance with so many amazing people. The students there really are a friendly and encouraging bunch. I don’t know that I would have stepped up to the next level if it weren’t for a classmate’s prodding and that support goes a long way to making or breaking an experience. With another person passionate about teaching adults I have the confidence that the program can return and surpass its past successes.

BBS-ASDP Round 3!

Signed up kind of last minute to do the Boston Ballet School’s adult summer program again this year.

The cost keeps creeping up and with an emergency HVAC system replacement in my condo earlier this year I was questioning whether it was fiscally responsible to do it, but… it was a great experience the last two years and I appreciate the opportunity to escape the routine of my regular dance existence, so I entered my credit card number and clicked submit before I could talk myself out of it for the 4,000th time.

Program starts Monday. I’d been stalking the website to see when they were going to post the day-by-day schedule. It finally went up this week and… hm. Not nearly the variety of teachers I’ve seen in the past. Actually the entire schedule looks a bit… paltry.

So I did some googling and found this. BBS’s head of adult programming took off for sunnier skies, it seems. Not surprising, but definitely disappointing. I think he was supposed to have taken a job in San Fran last fall and somehow ended up not, but clearly the writing was on the wall that he was on his way out. It’ll be a tough loss for the school on the whole, but I’m particularly nervous about what this spells for BBS’s adult program.

I guess the next couple weeks will give some insight to that. Cautiously optimistic. Sigh.

A couple things I noted on the schedule…

Lots of familiar teachers. I felt like there was a pretty big variety last year, especially in the Intermediate level, but this year it seems to be just a small handful of BBS faculty regulars. I’ve taken class with all of them except one and it’s a great group, but bummed to be missing out on some of the teachers we got to experience last year.

Intermediate and Advanced are combined again this year for Rep/Variations. That’s how it was my first year and it was kind of a shit-show. I think they did it because originally there weren’t enough people signed up for those two levels to justify having separate rep/variation classes, though they must have gotten a bunch of last-minute registrations, because there ended up being close to 50 people between the two. Last year they kept the levels separate and I thought everything went much more smoothly. But this year we’re combined again. Whether this is due to low registration or a lack of interested faculty… hard to say.

As for the “extras” (lectures, etc.) there appears to be only one this year: the company dancer Q&A which I assume will consist of Sarah Wroth and Corina Gill since they’re both on the schedule to teach that day. Sarah spoke two years ago and I took a Swan Lake master class from Corina this winter. They’re both great ladies, so I’m looking forward to hearing from them, but I’m kind of disappointed that’s the only “special” thing on the docket. No PT lecture (which generally devolved into people just asking advice on their own aches and pains, but did have some good info), no history lecture, no opportunity to attend company class.

Lest you think I’m all doom and gloom, there are things I’m quite excited about.

First off is a new conditioning program that they’re offering in the enrichment session. This replaces the Pilates option from prior years. I really liked Pilates, but am psyched for a more comprehensive training program. The guy teaching it works with the company dancers and school year-round, so should be a great experience and hopefully will offer some insights I can take into my regular life for cross-training, etc.

Also, the other option during the enrichment session is (still) modern, but there will be two teachers this year. I liked the one who taught previously (and who is still there), but am looking forward to another perspective since modern isn’t something I get to do as often as I’d like.

And then there’s the rep/variations which will be from Giselle. Though it’s one of the classics I’m sadly completely unacquainted with it, so I’m glad to getting to know it a bit!

Will try to post updates as I go. Clearly this blog has not been at the forefront of my priority list lately, but I’ll try to consciously move it up a bit!

Going Green

Interrupting the radio silence here to show you what I saw yesterday:

BB on the Greenway

That, my dears, is some of the fine men of Boston Ballet performing a brief excerpt of John Neumeier’s “Third Symphony of Gustav Mahler” on the Rose Kennedy Greenway in Boston… conveniently located just off my commute home!

The point of this… I’m not entirely sure. I think they were trying to promote art on the Greenway, for one. The Greenway, for those non-Bostonians among you, is a fairly new super-wide median/park near the waterfront/Financial District. For many decades this was the location of an elevated highway that was jammed with traffic from day one and was hella ugly, to boot. Soon after they built it they realized it was a Dumb Decision and thought maybe they could bury the highway underground, which after few decades and a few billion dollars of overruns, they did manage to do. There was much rejoicing. After they took down the old highway infrastructure they turned the former location into green space and, voila, here we are. It’s very beautiful and near lots of touristy things, so if you’re in town, do check it out, especially if you remember the old behemoth that used to live there!

They’ve installed various pieces of art on the Greenway, pretty much all of which is of a fairly temporary nature. They even have murals painted on some of the air shaft buildings that vent the new underground highway that get painted over and redone every year or so. Currently there’s a big piece of artwork hanging over part of the Greenway that I can’t even begin to describe other than… it looks like enormous pieces of mosquito netting suspended from the sky. It’s lit up at night and is kind of cool to look at, but is only here for a few more weeks (I doubt it would sustain our notorious winters anyway). So I guess they thought it would be cool do to some human sculptures beneath it.

And also… Boston Ballet is opening the 2015-16 season in a couple short weeks with “Third Symphony…” so good opportunity for them to build some buzz.

It was a perfect day for it, sunny and 70 (they were originally supposed to do this last week, when it was raining and 55 degrees out, so thank goodness for rain dates!). But… kind of a weird event overall. Not particularly well advertised… I only found out about it from some random snooping on the Boston Ballet website when I was looking for info on this ballet. And they only showed a very brief excerpt of the piece (though they did it about 4 or 5 times). I felt like it was mostly a photo shoot that they tried to turn into a performance and the whole thing kind of fell flat as an “event.” While I was watching the dancers standing around I felt like even they were kind of thinking, “WTF are we doing?!” But whatevs, a free opportunity for me to see some of the dancers dance up close, so that’s cool! You can’t go wrong with nice buns in white tights, amiright?!

For some more (professional) pictures, check out Boston.com’s slideshow here.

ASDP 2015 – Week One

Blogapathy is still reigning here, I suppose.

Either that or I’ve become too cool for school now that I’m an ASDP veteran.

Not sure whether my readers (are you still here?) will be rejoicing or lamenting my lack of minute-to-minute chronicles of the ASDP experience, but I do want to keep some sort of record here. And now that week one has wrapped up, this is the perfect time…

This year I’ve got peeps with me, which is pretty cool. Although I really enjoyed my anonymity last year (I didn’t know any of the teachers or students in the program and it was kind of nice to dance on a clean slate), it’s also nice to share the experience with people you have an established relationship with. I’d mentioned that one of the kids (well, technically an adult now) was joining me for the core program this year. Well, a few weeks ago I brought up the ASDP in conversation with someone at work and was surprised a few days later when she started asking me questions about it. I was all… “Wait a minute, do you… dance?!” It turns out she had danced as a kid and was thinking of getting into it again. I mentioned that they had beginner and elementary levels and between the two she should find a good space to dip her toe back in the water. So she bit the bullet and signed up, too.

The program is set up pretty much the same as last year. The core program generally includes an hour and a half technique class followed by an hour of something else. Most often the “something else” is repertoire, but can also be a technique workshop, variations class, or a lecture of some sort. Then there is an optional enrichment session that takes place for an hour before the core program. Last year it alternated between modern and Pilates. This year students got to choose which of the two to take (though we could pick between the two and alternate if we wanted to).

So let’s start with the enrichment session. I got there the first day and the girl behind the desk asked which I was taking and I told her I wanted to do both. “So which days are you going to do which?” she asked me. Um… I thought YOU were supposed to give ME that information, not vice versa. I dunno! Isn’t there a plan?

Well, I ended up doing modern on day one, dragging coworker with me. Helena Froelich is teaching this class again this year and I enjoy her technique… as I mentioned last year, it’s very similar to the technique one of my modern professors in college taught, so it gives me a sense of happy nostalgia. The following day, I did Pilates (coworker in tow, once again). Same teacher as last year there, too. I hadn’t done Pilates since then, so it took some remembering, but it came back to me. Coworker decided that she was going to stick with Pilates from here on out since she was worried that modern might be a bit much based on the length of her dance hiatus and she figured something more fitness-based was a bit less intimidating. I returned to modern on Wednesday, but this was when I realized that the whole “choose-your-own-adventure/enrichment” method was not really as well thought-out as I expected. The people who were in modern on Tuesday had started learning a combination and Wednesday they were adding on to that combination… and I had absolutely no idea what was going on. So at that point I decided that it would be Pilates from here on out. I’m bummed to miss out on modern, but I just find it too frustrating to spend that much of a class lost and confused. And yes, I could ask for more of a breakdown of the combination, but it doesn’t seem fair to those who are doing modern every day to have to slow down to accommodate those who are switchers, so… rawr.

On to technique classes… first up, the levels: first day we had an abbreviated class since we had a welcome meeting that cut into class time. During the meeting they mentioned that the first technique class should be thought of as a placement class and that if the teacher felt we would fit better in another level that they would sort things out there. Which is good. It’s kind of hard sometimes to tell from a description which class will fit you best. I had told my coworker to sign up for elementary initially since she did have pretty extensive ballet background as a kid, so she might be fine there and, if not, she could always go to beginner, but better to try the more advanced level and see how it went. She reported back after class that she had, in fact, been demoted. She felt like the teacher worried she might be offended by this news, to which she was all, “Um, no, that’s fine!” She knew that elementary was a bit ambitious and I think was kind of relieved to be given the go-ahead to drop down to something more manageable. My collegiate friend and I, though… well, our experience was a bit different. After day one we were feeling a bit frustrated for the opposite reason… we were bored. But no one said boo to us. And we were left wondering whether we should say anything to anyone or hope that it would get more challenging or… something? After day two my friend ended up switching to the advanced level. And I… well, I just stayed in intermediate.

Why? I’m still questioning myself about that. Part of it, I guess, is knowing that my friend is, in fact, a more advanced dancer than me. She was always one of the best dancers at our studio and, weird as it may be, I’ve looked up to her since I started there, despite being nearly old enough to be her… uh, big sister… because she is talented and has such focus and meticulous attention to detail. So I can see that she should be in the advanced class. But… I’m not sure that the same applies to me. I’ve joked that she is my sister from another mister, but I don’t really want people to think I’m comparing myself to her when she is clearly far more talented than I am. So… that’s thing one. Thing two is that, while intermediate class can be a bit slow at times the upside is that I feel competent in there! Not perfect, mind you. I screw up plenty. As one of our instructors reminded us, #thestruggleisreal and boy, is it ever, but at the same time that feeling of competence gives me more confidence and I feel like I can get out there and actually dance full out. I worry that I would completely lose that in the advanced class, that I would retreat back to the shadows and hope that no one will see me. Then there’s thing three: mysterious injury to inner thigh (don’t want to aggravate it further) and thing four: I mapped out all the teachers for both intermediate and advanced and there are a bunch of teachers that I wouldn’t get to experience if I was in the advanced level and that would make me sad.

Speaking of teachers, so far we’ve had Hird, Jeffries, Beckwith, Leeth, and Kelley (any BBS regulars will probably recognize at least a few of those names). Jeffries was the only one I’d never had class with before, but this year we have worked with him nearly every day. First day he did our workshop (pirouettes & allegro) and he’s also working with the intermediates on our repertoire piece (see below). Both he and C. Hird are very technically-focused with clean combinations and clear corrections. Beckwith teaches a very beautiful, flowy class, emphasizing the “dance” part of it. Her classes freaked me out last year because I never felt like I quite got what she was looking for, but this year I enjoyed her class very much. And Kelley is like the best of all worlds: very technical, but also very focused on port de bras and épaulment and where the eyes should be focused… he’s great at explaining the coordination of all those elements, which a lot of teachers gloss over or just expect you to figure it out yourself.

We had three nights of repertoire last week. We’re all learning pieces from Sleeping Beauty this year and the intermediates are doing the nymph dance from… is it Act II? I’m not sure. I heard it’s on YouTube, but I could find nothing resembling the dance we’re doing, so don’t quote me on that. I guess it’s where Aurora meets the Lilac Fairy and all her friends. It’s rather aerobic, that’s for sure. Lots of ballotés which occasionally makes us look more like a band of deranged leprechauns than adorable nymphs flitting around, but it’s getting there. Mr. Jeffries set it and worked with us the first two days, but then Gene Murray (who I talked about here) worked with us on the third day to “clean” it. I thought we were going to give the poor man a stroke… it was pretty abominable. But it got… better? (Still time to work on it this week, thank goodness!)

One night was variations with C. Hird. The men from elementary and advanced were pulled in to worked on the Bluebird variation while the intermediate ladies learned the Aurora variation from Act III. I was able to find the choreo for this one on YouTube. Not only that, but it’s Boston Ballet’s version with Misa Kuranaga!

After the variations class we also had a physical therapy lecture with one of the PTs who works with BB company dancers. Most of the time was spent with people asking questions about their own injuries and the info was pretty much the same as what she gave to last year’s group, but I liked having this as part of the intensive. She also gave us the name of a dance medicine doc that I am planning to call about this nagging hip issue I’ve been dealing with for the past two months. Bonus is that they’re located at Boston Children’s Hospital which is just a couple blocks from the hospital where I work.

Overall, a great week. It’s tiring (especially after putting in a full day at the office), but I’m getting different things out of it the second time around and it’s nice to see some of my own growth from last year.

The adventure continues this week… stay tuned!

Whatever helps…

Was in a cute gourmet grocery chain this weekend (the kind with classical music and dim lighting that makes you want to linger and lull you into buying overpriced goodies) and spied this among the teas:

IMG_20150803_152801600

Hmmm… as I recall from last year’s ASDP the first couple days did render me a bit stiff. Decided I should add this to my office tea stash (I have a huge stash of tea despite hardly ever drinking the stuff… I think I like the ritual of making tea more than the actual drinking of it).

Haven’t brewed any yet, so can’t say whether it works or not. Mostly bought it as a gag gift for myself, but who knows, maybe it’ll turn me into Gumby. Worth a shot especially since I managed to tweak one of my inner hip flexors a couple months ago and it’s taking forever to recover. I’ll take any assistance I can get!

T-minus two hours until the start of ASDP 2015… woot woot!!!