ASDP – Day 1!

Still not knowing what to do about travel I decided to try to T it on day 1. Coworker suggested I leave work at a time I considered unnecessarily early to make sure I didn’t have to rush (see the pesky bus schedule referenced last post… per Google maps I’d either get to the studio over an hour ahead of time or would barely make it… tough choice; she voted for getting there an hour early). I got to my T stop just as a train was pulling in. So far, so good! Got off at the prescribed stop. Didn’t know where I was supposed to go, but followed a random guy which turned out to be the right way, and found the bus stop. Okay, this is going well! Then I pulled up the where’s-my-bus app and…. bus was nowhere near me.

Well… I thought maybe I’d explore some of Newton’s scenic countryside and walk up to the next bus stop. Get a little warm up in on my travels! Yeah! I figured the bus would be along before I got too far.

So I walked. And walked. Walked some more. Each time I came to a bus stop I checked to see where the bus was and it never seemed to get anywhere near where I was. After about 2.3 miles (literally) the bus caught up to me… at the stop where I would have disembarked! Rawr. Did I mention that it was like 80% humidity and I was wearing business attire and flip-flops for this trek? Yeah, okay, walking was my choice. It was my own lack of patience and inability to stand still that resulted in that long walk. But still. Grrrrrr.

I got to the nondescript building Google maps said was the studio. Um… are you sure, Google? Then I saw a door with the BBS name on it instructing people to enter at the side door. I peeked around the side to see… NO DOORS. But I saw a parking lot behind the building and a couple ladies were walking across it who looked like potential ASDP-ers so kept walking along the side until I found the main entry tucked behind. Walked in and was faced with four people behind the counter. None of whom seemed to notice my presence. I’m sure I looked a bit of a sight by that point, but seriously, hello! Finally one looked at me, asked my name, handed me a name tag and gave me directions to the locker room and the studio I needed to go to.

Relieved that I had made it there with a few minutes to spare, I quickly changed into tights/leo (a gross task when already sweaty), pulled on a tee shirt, pinned on my name tag and grabbed some slippers, a skirt, and some jazz pants (wasn’t sure what the plan was, so wanted to make sure all bases were covered).

First up was the “enrichment” session. This was an add-on to the main program and takes place in the hour before the regular session. I wanted to get all I could out of the experience, plus I would’ve just spent that hour killing time after work otherwise, so it was worth the extra fee. They said that the enrichment would feature classes in modern and Pilates, but said nothing about which was when.

There was a crowd of students outside our assigned studio on the floor, so I sat near them and waited. A teacher came out of the studio and said, “Oh, I was wondering where the students were! Come on in!” So we file in and see a few yoga mats on the floor. A few of us tried to figure out whether we had a choice between classes, or what the story was. Someone said that this session was a combination of the intermediate and advanced students and we were doing Pilates today while the beginners and elementary students did Modern next door. Oh. Okay. Now that that mystery has been solved comes the realization that none of us had mats because we didn’t know we needed mats. Thankfully BBS had some for us to use, so back out to the hallway we go to gather mats. We get ourselves arranged and the teacher introduces herself. Stott Pilates is her specialty. She asks if there’s anyone in the room who has never taken Pilates before. The lone guy raised his hand. She assures him he’ll be fine and off we go. I found the directions a bit confusing at times. It’s been quite some time since I took any sort of Pilates and I don’t think it was Stott method (I don’t know the differences among the methods). But I followed along as best I could and I was relieved to find out that I could still do everything for the most part. It actually felt really good to get into all those core muscles. Might have to seek out a Pilates class once this is over.

Once our hour was up we collected our mats and returned them to their cabinet and went to the studio next door where all the students were gathered for a welcome meeting. We sat down and Christopher Hird, BBS’s Head of Adult Programming, welcomed us and introduced some of the faculty we’d be working with. He went over the rough plan for the two weeks: technique class each day followed by a class where we would learn rep/variations — except a couple “workshop” days to work on things that adults have asked to focus on in the past, e.g. pirouettes. There would also be two special lectures, one being a talk about the history of BB and another with a PT. We’d also have a Q&A session with two BB principals. There would be some other faculty coming in to teach us at various points. And at the end of the two weeks we would get to do a little presentation (NOT a performance, they assured us). Oh, and there was an opportunity for a few students to go see a company class and tour the Boston studios next Thursday during the day. Limited seats, first come, first serve. I really really wanted to be able to do that, but it’s a day that I have a meeting at work that would probably conflict with the times. Sad face.

After that they chatted a bit about levels (if, after the first class, you felt you were in the wrong one or if the instructor felt that you were in the wrong one you’d be able to switch) and some other administrative stuff. Then they gave us the opportunity to share our stories if we wanted to. There was a wide range of students from adult beginners to those who have danced since they were toddlers. While only a few people spoke I looked around the room and saw a lot of different ages, body types, clothing choices. Not many guys, but there were a few. It was nice to feel like this really was a place where anyone could feel welcome.

With that we were sent off to our respective studios. The intermediates ended up staying in the same studio, so we didn’t have far to travel. And it is a deliciously large studio! I think I counted around 24 students in our class and there was room for plenty more if they appeared. Christopher Hird was our instructor for the day. Since the meeting had taken up a good chunk of time, barre ended up taking up most of our time with a brief adage at the end. I really liked the combinations. The combinations weren’t boring, but they also weren’t so absurdly complex that I couldn’t keep technique in mind. I think everyone got some sort of individual correction and after each side there were corrections.

My correction was simple, but kind of mind-blowing, too: move my hand forward on the barre and stand a smidge closer. It sounds silly, but it really changed my ability to feel square. Hmph. Lots of good group corrections to incorporate, too. Like how our working leg generally wants to bend a bit during arabesque penchée.

In general I felt pretty good during this class. Balances felt REALLY good. Could be a new environment, or a moon phase, or maybe that Pilates class beforehand.

After our class broke the advanced students came in with their teacher, Christopher Anderson, for the last hour. It was kind of a workshop, kind of just a continuation of class. We spent about half the time on pirouettes followed by allegro. Alas, I did not discover the secret to pirouettes, but we did do some good exercises that I will have to try to remember. I realized that I rarely think about my back in pirouettes… that might help me to stay square. And I rarely bother to spot. Which isn’t such a huge deal when doing singles. But makes it difficult to do more than that! Then we moved on to jumping. I love jumping. I learned that exercises should always progress “two feet to one feet.” Hahaha. Two footed jumps should always be practiced before moving to one footed jumps. And you should always do a medium allegro (I feel like there’s a more appropriate word than “medium,” but can’t think of what it is) in between petit and grand. Doesn’t help if you’re in a class where the teacher doesn’t choose to follow that, but I’ll file that knowledge away in case I ever teach again. My major embarrassment in this section came during an across the floor where I starting thinking about some detail of the combination halfway through a pas de chat and totally blanked on what I was supposed to be doing and ended up doing what I can only refer to as a “pas de blah.” The teacher came up to me to tell me how to do a pas de chat and I was like… yeah… I know… I, uh… my brain… uh… yeah. Mortifying.

Ah well. Class over. Then to try to get home. My less-than-wise decision was to walk to the closest public transit that my T pass worked on which was a mile and a half away. After the walk, a bus ride, and two train rides and my commuter bus, it was well past midnight by the time I got home. Needless to say I decided that I will NOT be using public transport to get there ever again. Traffic and parking costs be damned, I’m driving for the next two weeks!

A bit sore today, but excited to go back for evening #2! Very glad I finally decided to do this!

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