ASDP – Winding down

Getting close to the end… sadness! It’s been such a fun ride!

Wednesday:

Modern — We have a drummer to accompany us in class. Yet I apparently chose this day to march to one unseen and unheard by anyone but myself… Was having some sort of processing issues and felt as though I was perpetually out of step. WTF?! I blame the fact that I got to the studio frazzled. I left work with plenty of time, but right before the last stop on the T the train ground to a halt and didn’t move for a good 10 minutes. “Signal problems,” they said. Grr. I’ll give them a signal problem! And worst, we were only a few hundred feet from the station. I hate when you can see where you need to be… just can’t get there. Then it took ages to get out of the parking lot because of traffic on the main road. A mile or so later I came across an accident blocking half the road. None of this had any bearing on the end result, which was that I still got to the studio with time to change and get into class before it started, but my disgruntled-ness spilled over into class. Or something. And of course this is the day that the videographer was in the studios getting footage in case they decide to do a promotional video. Grumbles. At least we have one more modern class on Friday in which I plan to redeem myself.

Technique — For the first time we had a repeat teacher! Kristen Beckwith was leading us. I found her class very lyrical last week and this one was the same. I felt much more capable this time, though. Maybe because I had a better idea of what her expectations? Not sure, but the frustration I felt the week before was gone. I pushed myself on technique and tried to make it somewhat pretty. She has a great way of incorporating clean technique and artistry. More than once she reminded us that we were supposed to be having fun… it’s okay to “dance” it and, in fact, it’s encouraged! Good class. We get her one more time on Friday.

Typically we have rep or variation after technique class, but instead we had a Q&A session with some BB pros! Principals Petra Conti and Eris Nezha and corps de ballet member Sarah Wroth kindly shared an hour with us talking about their experience as dancers. They talked about how they got into ballet, how they transitioned from student to professional, how they approach their roles, etc.

Nezha and Conti are a husband-wife pair, only been with the company since last fall, coming from Teatro alla Scalla in Italy. Nezha sounds like he was chosen to do ballet without really knowing what he was signing up for, but fell in love with it, got his training and worked his way up. Conti came from a family of dancers and said she always danced around the house, and announced around age 10 that she wanted to pursue training at the highest level possible. It was only then that she realized that things that came to her quite naturally (flexibility, high arches) were highly desirable. While Nezha said his first four years of training were the most challenging, Conti said her first few years were the easiest since so many things came naturally to her and from what she told us of her career it’s clear that hard work combined with a ton of natural talent has propelled her to star level at a young age. They are an adorable couple, clearly in love with one another and with ballet. In spite of being international stars they seem very grounded.

While it was great to hear from them, Sarah Wroth’s story was one I could relate to a bit better. As opposed to those who have been groomed for a professional career from a very early age, her story was more of an accidental ballerina. She told us that she started ballet at 7 because her mom wanted her to have some sort of physical outlet after school. A friend was taking dance, so she started taking dance. It was something to do. But it turns out that she was a bit obsessive with getting it right. And the harder she worked, the better she got. Still, she didn’t think of it as a valid career choice until she went to college where she studied dance and began to realize exactly how much passion she had for ballet. She auditioned for various companies including BB, her “reach” company. She didn’t expect to be accepted since she had no professional experience, but at the end she was offered a job. As someone who has had varied passions throughout her life, I’ve often wondered, with a bit of envy, how someone can commit to a career path at the age of 10 and stick with it. Most people don’t stick with it, of course. But there’s always that curiosity about, “What would have happened if I weren’t such a dilettante?” It was nice to hear from someone who took time to reach a decision about what role ballet would play in her life and was able to make it. Maybe her career trajectory has been different because of her delayed decision. But she also seems to be very thoughtful about her career and I expect that she won’t be one of those dancers left wondering what the heck to do with herself once the pointe shoes get put on the shelf. While I was listening to her talk I kept thinking, geez, I’d love to go out for a drink with this woman, she’s hilarious! I was also struck by how collegial all the dancers were… granted, we were only seeing a tiny fraction of the company, but I’ve heard that they are a fairly close-knit company, not as cut-throat as things like “Black Swan” would have us believe. The way they interacted and spoke to us certainly supported that claim. Lots of mutual respect and support.

Thursday:

Pilates — Last one! Class size seems to keep dwindling, but the diehards among us were there. A few new things… and a weird intercostal muscle twinge for me on some of them. But good class overall. I really would like to do more with Pilates since it has helped me to feel much stronger and centered.

Technique — C. Anderson taught our class again. Even though we’ve only had one other technique class with him he’s been kind of a constant presence through our rep classes. No major revelations on this particular day, just continuing the struggle to maximize my minimal degree of turnout and figuring out how to keep my ribs down but my chest lifted.

Repertory — We continued cleaning up the Swan Lake polonaise, but only had about half an hour because…

Lecture — Thursday’s session ran a bit long so that we could have a lecture from a PT who works with athletes and performing artists (including, obviously, dancers!). She talked a bit about the basic differences that come in treating dancers as opposed to other athletes, such as the fact that it’s neither desirable nor advantageous to keep dancers out of the studio entirely while they recover from injuries, but that they have moved more towards modified classes that will allow the dancer to maintain a degree of strength and technique while allowing the injury to heal. She talked about injury treatment and took a lot of questions from people in the audience. I didn’t learn too much that I hadn’t already picked up from A) being a nurse, B) following Lisa Howell online, and C) the e-mails I receive from IADMS. Thankfully I haven’t had too many issues with injuries, so I would have liked to hear more about maximizing our abilities as adults rather than repairing muscle tears, but that’s just me. I thought this was a great lecture topic, just that it could have been put together a little differently to maximize the time.

Next post… last day and final impressions!

ASDP – Day 4!

Day 4 offered some welcome respite… mainly in the fact that I worked from home that day which allowed me to get in a couple more hours of sleep. Ah, sweet rest!

This was the first time I’d driven to BBS-Newton directly from home and for some reason my Waze app sent me on a epic odyssey through the ‘burbs surrounding Boston. Knowing what traffic (or traffuck as I’ve heard it referred to quite aptly!) is like at that hour, I don’t doubt that this was actually the fastest way. Thank the gods for technology, otherwise I’d likely still be sitting on the highway.

Enrichment class for the intermediate-advanced levels was modern (have you picked up on the pattern here? Pilates-modern-Pilates-modern…), again taught by Helena Froehlich. And, once again, I loved it. My body seems to adapt to the demands of modern far more naturally than it does ballet. At least this style of modern, whatever style that may be (I love modern, but am sadly ignorant about most of the details on various techniques). Most of the exercises were similar to those from the last class. She added a bunch to our across-the-floor combination, though, which was tricky to catch on to at first, but was really fun once we did (per me, anyway…). And we ended the class with I guess what you’d call a modern grand allegro, doing a run-run-grand jété in double attitude across the floor. Which was AWESOME! Why? Because I got that point where you feel like you might stay suspended in the air if only you don’t look down, just like a cartoon character who’s run off the edge of cliff, but doesn’t realize it yet.

Technique was in one of the smaller studios. I like the space of the grand studio, but it’s weirdly dim, so I welcomed the move to a brighter studio even if we were a bit cozy in there! Helena was teaching our class that day. No major revelations to report in class. Balance was a bit off at the barre. Turning fairy wasn’t drunk, but she may have been hungover — got some clean singles; anything attempted beyond that was flop city. But my muscles felt nice and stretchy. Did learn that BBS advocates that in a tendu from first to front or back the toe should “cross the line” so that at the end of the tendu the toe of the working foot is in line with the heel of the standing leg. Helena said it was kind of stylistic thing that can vary by school, but they feel that it’s a better preparation for working from fifth and encourages more proper alignment. Will have to remember that when I go back to real life.

After technique we were back to the grand studio with the advanced level for variations! Ooh, something new! Christopher Hird was leading this class. We were learning the pas de trois from the first act of Swan Lake. I’m sensing a theme here… BB is opening the 2014-15 season with a new version of Swan Lake, so it seems they’re trying to build some buzz through the ASDP. To their credit, it is working. I can’t wait to see the bits we’ve learned performed on stage by the professionals! There are two guys and about 40 ladies in the class, so the guys got quite the workout while the ladies did a lot of marking (we divided into two groups, with one group learning “Girl 1″ and the other learning “Girl 2″), but I enjoyed learning more choreography.

Typically we are done after this class, but on this night the variations class was shortened by 15 minutes to allow for a 45 minute lecture by Laura Young, a current BBS faculty member who was an original member of Boston Ballet and danced with them as a principal dancer from the age of 18-42! It wasn’t a lecture in the sense that she stood up and rattled off a series of events, but Christopher Hird asked various questions about her experience as a dancer. The part I found most fascinating was that she had started dancing with BB’s predecessor, New England Civic Ballet, when she was only 13. It sounds like it was just a small company made up largely of students. She was telling us that the moms made costumes, her dad and brother were involved in set design. The families of the dancers were what got it up and running. It’s amazing that something went from such humble, homegrown beginnings to where it stands now. And amazing that she has seen it through all of its phases. There’s an article that goes into more of her details on the BB website here and one from the Boston Globe written this year in honor of the 50th anniversary if you’re interested in learning more about her and BB’s growth over the years.

The lecture meant that we got out a bit later than usual, but I was glad to see that so many people stayed to listen. Inspiration doesn’t just come from practice, but comes from shared experiences and realizing that, as minor a cog we may be, we are all part of sustaining and growing ballet!

One more day for week 1!

The Misty Buzz

So, the whole Misty Copeland Under Armour ad has been everywhere lately. Even people I didn’t think were into ballet are posting it on their Facebook feed and it’s all over the news lately.

If you’ve — somehow — missed it, here you go:

Let me start by saying that there are a lot of great things about this ad.

I love anything that puts ballet into the media.

I love that it shows the true athleticism required to be an elite dancer. It’s not just flapping one’s arms about and looking pretty… you need to have incredible strength to make it look that easy. So kudos to UA for showing that.

It bucks the unhealthy waif myth about ballerinas.

And, it has a kick-ass reminder to stay strong and keep working hard for what you want.

But… I have some issues with the ad campaign, or at least some of the press it’s generated.

For one thing, I’ve seen a lot about how this shows that ballet is a sport. Ballet is NOT a sport, it is an art. Yes, it is an art that requires a great deal of athleticism. But it is not a sport. Sure, it is reduced to sport in some areas. We try to grade dancers on technical abilities and artistic merit. But so much of what makes ballet great is the unspoken communication between performer and viewer. And that can be a very personal thing.

I mean, I love hockey. And yeah, it can get me very emotional at times. But much of the emotion is related to whether a goal was scored or a save was made. As a spectator and fan I don’t really care if a goal was pretty or not, if a save was a case of x-ray vision or pure, dumb luck. It’s the end result.

In ballet there’s so much more to see. I’ve gone to ballets where my companion and I saw the exact same show and had two very different interpretations and reactions to what we saw. There is no final score. The end result is up for debate.

So, sorry, opiners, Misty Copeland is an athletic artist, not a sportswoman.

Then, the voice-over. Is this a letter that Misty received? Or is this something Under Armour made up for a good story? Because from what I’ve read of Misty, she never even really danced until she was 13 and was encouraged to pursue it even though her family had doubts. She had such pure, raw talent that the ballet teachers who saw her pushed to do it, far from the discouraging tone of the words in the voice-over. Maybe this is a real letter, but it just doesn’t jibe with what I’ve read of her story. I want to know more about that…

And then there’s something else… I guess maybe the fact that this is so focused on this feeling of rebellion. That, yeah, Misty might not be the image that pops into someone’s head when they think of a generic ballerina, but she had grit, strength, and a don’t-tell-me-no attitude that propelled her to the elite ranks. I’m sure all of that is true. It’s just… there are a lot of plucky, gritty, strong, determined dancers that don’t make it. And the message of this ad seems to be, well, clearly they just didn’t want it enough. The reality is sometimes you do all you can and things don’t work out the way you wanted. And sometimes you end up in a dream position without even knowing that’s where you wanted to be.

I’m not quite sure what point I’m trying to make here. It’s just, I see all these people (mostly people who know zip-zero-nada about dance) being all, “Ooh, this is so awesome, so inspiring!!!” and I’m like, yeah, it’s cool, but…

Something about it just doesn’t quite ring true to me, and I can’t put my finger on what that is.

Anyway, all that aside, the big burning question I have out of this ad campaign is… when is Under Armour going to get into the leotard business? Because, seriously? I sweat like nobody’s business in class and I could use some of that awesome wicking technology in my leos so I don’t look like I just I’ve been to the swimming pool instead of ballet class.

Ballet @ Home: First Finis Jhung DVD Review!

Argh, slacking again!

I have so many topics I’ve been meaning to blog about: our studio’s annual show, an open adult ballet class I took in Cambridge, my review of a new pair of ballet slippers, and news of an upcoming giveaway (yayyyyy, free stuff!).

Hopefully I’ll get around to all of that.

But today I’m going to do a DVD review for all you living room ballerinas and danceurs out there!

I had heard of Finis Jhung from one of my dance teachers who has taken his workshops in the past. She enjoys using some of his music in class (which I affectionately refer to as “the creepy circus music,” but that’s another story!) and spoke very highly of his teaching methods. I’d love to go to NYC and take one of his classes in person, but since I haven’t been able to do that I figured putting a couple of his DVDs into my Netflix queue was the next best thing.

Coincidentally the first one, “Level 1: Barrework for Beginners,” arrived just as summer session at the studio was starting. Yesterday was day 3 of said session. The 4.5 hours of dance over the two days prior following a good three weeks off was telling on me! So… I wasn’t TOO disappointed when my commute got me home a tiny bit too late to make it to ballet. But… since I had this DVD at home I figured I’d give it a try to make up for my missing class.

Now, I’m not a huge fan of DIY ballet. I think the best place to learn is in a studio with a proper floor, mirrors, space, etc., with a qualified teacher. But I understand that’s not always available to everyone and that not all “beginner” classes cater to true beginners and that some people just want to have an adjunct way to practice at home. If any of those categories include you, I highly recommend this DVD.

It’s 90 minutes long, so about the length of a regular ballet class, but it is, essentially, all-barre. If you’re new to ballet or just looking to get back to basics (or, like me, have very limited non-carpeted space in which to practice) this fits the bill perfectly.

It’s divided into 16 (?) exercises. Each exercise is named so you can see the words written out. Finis introduces each exercise and explains not only what the combination is, but why it’s important to dancers, and mistakes to watch out for. Then his assistant, Jennifer, joins him to demonstrate the exercise full-out while he talks her through it and makes corrections.

Jennifer clearly knows her way around a dance studio, but I found her to be a lovely demonstrator. She’s good, but not pro-perfect. Strong, but not a twig. Okay, I actually just Googled her and it looks like she is a professional modern dancer. Obviously has a ballet background, but it’s not her main thing.

The exercises start at the very basic-basic level with what he calls “Number One” which is basically learning proper posture. He references it throughout the DVD to remind the home dancer to maintain that posture through all the exercises. He then introduces turn-out with an exercise that teaches the dancer how to find his/her own natural turn-out and does a basic exercise incorporating that movement with some pliés and rélevés. Then he gets more into the plié concept in kind of a non-traditional way by using a super-wide second. From there it moves into more traditional barre elements of battements tendus, dégagés, port de bras, fondus, and grand battements.

Everything is very slow and methodical, but if you’re an absolute beginner the speed is just right. Don’t worry, if you’re doing everything properly you will work up a bit of a sweat. Finis emphasizes good technique throughout, reminding you to test your balance by letting go of your barre, seeing if you can lift your heel a bit to make sure your weight is placed properly, checking in a mirror to make sure you are maintaining a square center, keeping abs engaged, breathing, shoulders down, etc. He offers tips for correction that are pretty universal and understandable.

Now, of course, I’m not a beginner, so I guess I’m not the best person to tell you whether this is truly accessible to an absolute beginner. But having taught an absolute beginner class I felt that the elements were just about right. If I were still teaching I’d definitely incorporate many of his ideas. If you happen to be a teacher this would be a helpful DVD to have in your library!

As a more advanced dancer, I still felt like I still got a lot out of this. It gave me new ways to think about certain concepts and ideas to take into the studio to correct some bad habits or fix some of the things I find challenging.

So overall, while nothing beats a real class, this DVD comes remarkably close.

Pros: Clear instruction, good demonstration, nice explanations, and helpful corrections. Introduces steps in a way that isn’t overwhelming, but still gets an absolute beginner through most of what would be included in a basic barre.

Cons: The “scenery” isn’t terribly attractive and it kind of looks like it was filmed on a ’90s era camcorder (I think the copyright date is 2002, so it is a teensy bit dated). Depending on your “home studio” set-up, it may be difficult to find a space where you can set up a “barre” and see yourself in the mirror. And speaking of the barre, it would be really helpful if you had a real barre, which most people don’t.

Stay tuned for a review of Level 2: Barrework for Advanced Beginners!

You’re never too old to stop learning about dance

Even if you’re an icon in the business!

This video of Carmen de Lavallade has been making the rounds lately:

I love where she talks about struggling with not being able to do part of a dance the way she wanted to because her legs just didn’t work the same way anymore… both how she realized that, hey, it’s a solo, so no one is going to know if you change it, but also that by changing it she learned something more about the piece.

Just goes to show that no matter the challenges we encounter in the dance studio, whether 3 or 83, there’s always something to learn and a new way to grow.

If you find this interesting you should seek out the DVD “Carmen & Geoffrey,” a documentary about de Lavallade and her husband. They are both tremendous artists and a very cool couple!

Emeralds, Rubies, and Diamonds…

But why no sapphires?!?!

Why did you shun my most favorite of jewels, Mr. B? I think it would have rounded out the piece quite nicely, no?

*sigh*

As you have probably guessed, I finally saw George Balanchine’s iconic “Jewels” (1967). Boston Ballet wrapped up their 2013-2014, 50th anniversary season with it, and in doing so served to fill in a major hole in my ballet education!

The build-up to the show was nearly on par with the Nutcracker. Lia Cirio leaping in her “Rubies” costume has been plastered all over taxis and buses and such in Boston for months now. Meanwhile, “Pricked” was pretty much not advertised at all. Curious decision on their part.

My ballet companion for the evening and I got into town early enough to catch the pre-curtain talk. I was surprised to see so many people in attendance. Usually there is only a large handful of people in the audience, but there was probably twice the typical number for this one. The curtain was open giving us a sneak peak of the “Emeralds” backdrop, a cool, pale green backdrop with large green jewels pasted on it in an intricate design. The wings were draped in white. Very elegant feel, even if it gave me the impression more of peridots (a stone I am well-acquainted with, being an August baby!) than emeralds. The other thing we noticed was that there almost appeared to be a large stain in the middle of the backdrop, like the guy in charge of creating the backdrop spilled his beer while pasting stones on it or something. I’m guessing it was probably more likely the shadow of the “Rubies” backdrop behind it, but it was kind of distracting and shabby-looking.

Shannon Parsley, BB’s ballet master, led three BB dancers onstage to the chairs lined up across the front. These dancers represented a cross-section of the company and included Erica Cornejo, Principal; John Lam, Soloist; and Paul Craig, Corps de Ballet. Ms. Parsley gave a brief(ish) recap of the season for anyone who had been asleep for the past six months. I wanted her to wrap this part up a bit more quickly. Honestly, the people who are going to show up for the pre-curtain talk are most likely going to be the avid fans who already have a clue what the company is up to and don’t need the monotonous summary of where they’ve been and what they’ve done. But… this probably is standard protocol for these things, so I tried to sit attentively and not fidget.

They then moved to the dancers who each talked about one of the pieces: Cornejo discussed “Emeralds,” Lam “Rubies,” and Craig “Diamonds.” Probably the most poignant part was when Cornejo, who danced in “Jewels” the last time BB presented it (in 2009, I think?) discussed that this is one of her first major ballets after returning to the stage post-baby. She dances the role of the “walking ballerina” in “Emeralds,” which is a role of someone who has lost her love, very emotional, but that becoming a mother has given her additional emotional fuel. She teared up on stage talking about it! Lam talked a bit about the energy required for the jazzier “Rubies” and Craig discussed the Imperial Russian feel that “Diamonds” demands.

After a few questions we were dismissed and went to indulge in overpriced cheap cabernet sauvignon and pretzel twists. Dinner of champions!

Then it was back to the theatre to our assigned seats to settle in for “Emeralds.” Ashley Ellis and Yury Yanowsky were the… happy couple (?), while Lia Cirio was the “walking ballerina” with Lasha Khozashvili was her partner. I haven’t really formed much of an opinion of Yanowsky before, other than the fact that I thought he bore a passing resemblance to Grégory Fitoussi (I’ve been thoroughly sucked into the world of Mr. Selfridge and the character of Henri Leclair, with his broody eyes and heart-melting smirk, may have been a small part of that obsession… I am completely at a loss now that the season is over!). But I love that Yanowsky is one of the few dancers who started with the company in the ’90s. In fact, he’s surpassed two decades with BB. That alone makes me fond of him. In such a youth-obsessed world, he’s showing the poise and elegance that an experienced dancer brings to the stage with no signs of disintegrating technique. Ellis looked radiant paired with him.

Lia Cirio seemed to lose herself in this one, which I liked… in some ways. “Emeralds” seems to have a rather refined feel to it, with the exception of this one couple that seems to wander through as if lost. Cirio threw herself into the role with abandon, but at times it felt like it was teetering on the edge of losing complete control. I suppose that’s the line one tries to balance on and she managed to keep from crashing over on the wrong side of the line.

And then the pas de trois. The casting was terrific and I’ve decided I really like that Isaac Akiba kid. Doesn’t hurt that he’s a home-grown dancer from BBS. He’s got a youthful look to him that lent itself nicely to the playful feel of the pas de trois, but behind that exterior is a very solid technique. I expect he’ll be growing through the ranks in the coming years.

After intermission, in which I supported the local economy by purchasing a Jewels tee (it was 3/4 sleeved and boatneck, trés cute!) and we made the rounds of the audience to find the other people we knew, we were treated to the jazzy “Rubies” set to music by Stravinsky. I guess this was supposed to be a bit of a tribute to Broadway, though perhaps Bernstein might have been a better composer?

So maybe a minute into the piece we hear this clacking. At first ballet companion and I thought that maybe the dancers had REALLY rosined up their shoes and were sticking to the marley… but then we realized that it was their costumes! The gigantic red stones on the skirts clacked together as they moved and made a tremendously distracting racket. Has it always been that way? Does it drive the dancers bananas to have to wear those? I know it would annoy the heck out of me!

Aside from that, I did like the energy in this one. I tend to like very active dancing with lots of jumps and non-traditional movements. Jeffrey Cirio and Misa Kuranaga were the central couple on the day I was there and, of course, I love them… though somehow I didn’t feel that this piece highlighted their chemistry and talents as well as other roles I’ve seen them in. Hmph.

After second intermission came — duh — “Diamonds” set to music by Tchaikovsky for the Imperial Russia experience. This one was impressive for the sheer number of dancers that are featured. Kathleen Breen Combes and Alejandro Virelles were the lead couple and can I tell you… I have a crush on Alejandro’s feet. My ballet companion had told me in advance to look out for them, but I don’t think I could have missed them. Ugh… makes a girl totes jeals. What a line! Breen Combes was absolutely lovely… until the very end. She is somehow both down-to-earth and totally elegant at the same time. She shows a level of maturity and grace that is lovely to watch. But something happened in the last few minutes. Not sure if she injured herself or if her shoe died a spectacular death, but I could tell she was struggling at the end. I feel so bad when I see that happen to dancers, especially lovely ones like her! I would guess, though, that if I were not a balletophile I probably would not have noticed. She kept going, masking any fumbles quite well. I did notice that the dancers were wearing white pointe shoes in this one, and I wondered if that contributed to the problem. Unlike the boatloads of pink shoes that the dancers can rifle through to find the right ones, I’m guessing there are only a few pairs of shoes in white, so the dancers might end up with something they consider less than ideal… just a theory on that one! I actually found the shoes distracting… might have liked them more if they were wearing white tights, as well, but I found it just interrupted the lines.

So, that was “Jewels.” Like most masterworks, I would need to see it a few times to truly absorb what all was going on and cement my opinion of the piece. As of now, “Serenade” is in no danger of being dethroned as my favorite Balanchine piece, but there were elements of this that I really appreciated. One thing I love in nearly all of Mr. B’s pieces is how he set steps to the music. Like many dancers, I have a tendency of choreographing dances in my head when I hear music, and it can be challenging when being choreographed ON and feeling that what you’re being asked to do doesn’t match with the music. Mr. B’s choreography matches what I hear in the music… so I feel some sort of bond with him over that, I guess!

And finally I’ll leave you with BB’s videos. First up is corps member Roddy Doble giving his thoughts on the pieces:

And now some snippets of the performances! This features the same cast I saw, but not sure if it’s from the same show or not.

Get Pricked

Boston Ballet is wrapping up their home season this coming week. Boo, hiss. But they are going out with a bang, presenting their last two shows back-to-back. Gotta be hell for the dancers, but good for those of us in the audience!

First up was Pricked, an evening of mixed rep.

The first piece on the bill was also the oldest: “Études” (1948) choreographed by Harald Lander originally for the Royal Theatre Copenhagen. BB has had it in their rep since ’88. They used a photo from “Études” for the cover of the subscriber folder which shows dancers at the barre in silhouette against a blue-lit backdrop. I loved the idea of a ballet that highlights some of the more routine parts of a dancer’s life, so I was looking forward to seeing this one. It was a full company piece with over 40 dancers featured at various points.

It starts out with this adorable segment of dancers at a long barre executing various tendus, dégagés, ronds de jambes, etc. The way it is lit you can really only see the legs and arms; everything else appears to be in the shadows. This lends itself to some really cool moments, but unfortunately for this to be truly stellar it needs to be majorly, majorly in sync. One foot turned out at a slightly different angle or someone rond de jambing with a slightly different accent makes it look a bit off. But, then again, that is reality, so… From there it progresses into the silhouette scene. And then the barres eventually go away and it goes through the other ballet class elements, but of course with fancier clothes, billion-times better technique, and without that one person who is perpetually going the wrong way and looking lost.

I feel like there wasn’t too much to say about this one. It’s neat to watch especially for anyone who studies ballet and has some pretty elements. The number of people in it is pretty spectacular. But placing it in the same show as “D.M.J.” and “Cacti” leads to it inevitably getting short shrift. Not really sure how this one fit into the “Pricked” theme. I felt like this might have been better placed in a show with perhaps more neo-classical stuff. Not sure.

Second on the program was “D.M.J. 1953-1977″ (2004) by Zuska, originally premiered by the National Theatre Brno of the Czech Republic. This was BB’s premiere of the work and — according to the program notes — they are the first North American company to perform it. This piece was much more my speed in terms of the raw emotion it displayed. It opens with with a man standing practically on the apron in front of a black curtain next to an object we assume represents a grave of some sort. Lasha Khozashvili was the male lead on the evening I was there and the pain he displayed was palpable. The curtain rises to show couples across the stage on what appear to be small platforms. They dance in unison in a nearly ritualistic sort of dance. Lia Cirio was the female lead and, I assume, is meant to represent the lost love. Cirio and Khozashvili seem to search for one another through this sea of dancers.

As the piece progresses the platforms (which I guess are actually super-thick mats of some sort) are used as props in a way. At one point they are lined up to create a wall which dancers peek over (the audience thought this was funny, though I’m not sure it was meant to be so). At another they are lined up and one gets pushed over to create a giant domino effect. Then, at the end, they are set up in a way that creates a giant sofa of some sort.

At that end Cirio and Khozashvili, almost literally, lay bare their emotions. The other dancers are gone. Up until that point the corps seemed to represent friends, perhaps, of the leads. They seem to mourn at various points, and yet their dances almost represent the challenge that those of us on the periphery of mourning experience: sadness, yet enough distance that our main focus remains navigating our own lives (and, in this case, loves). Inevitably, those at the center of the loss are left to process it alone. And that’s where this piece concludes. The leads are now wearing nude costumes and there is a pile of roses in front of the giant mat-sofa-thing. They dance together as if fighting against the inevitable. It was truly moving and the two leads were masterfully cast. I’m not always Lia’s biggest fan. I mean, I think she’s a tremendous dancer, but some roles I’ve seen her in just don’t seem to fit. In this, though, she and Lasha gave a heart-wrenching performance. Truly moving.

I was curious about the title, whether the initials and dates might have represented someone the choreographer had lost, but apparently the “D.M.J.” part is simply the initials of the last names of the three composers whose music was used in the piece. Hm.

The final piece of the evening, and the one which most obviously contributed to the “Pricked” title (though those roses in the second piece helped) was “Cacti” (Ekman, 2010). This was another BB premiere. The piece was first performed by Lucent Danstheatre in the Hague, Denmark.

“Cacti” was, by far, my favorite of the evening, if for no other reason than the energy of the piece. You can experience some of that energy here:

The costuming in this was pretty androgynous so you couldn’t always tell from the audience who were the girls and who were the guys. I kind of liked this because it showed that the female artists can (and do) perform with the same level of raw intensity that the men can. We spend so much time trying to make ballet look pretty that it’s awesome to see that those same ethereal-looking dancers can rage with the best of ‘em.

There was a fair amount of humor interspersed throughout this piece from the voice-overs to some of the scenery elements (including a cat that fell out of the rafters and a male dancer lying down holding a cactus that may or may not have appeared slightly phallic). That being said, there were a few people in the audience that either indulged in too much champagne at the bar or who had a really low threshold for amusement because they were roaring throughout nearly the whole thing and I wanted to find them and tell them to kindly STFU, already. Then again, I might be guilty of taking my ballet-going self a bit too seriously. Who knows.

Regardless, it was a highly energetic and entertaining way to end the evening. While I wasn’t sure how well all of the pieces fit together in one bill, it did manage to demonstrate the incredible breadth and talent that BB has. To have the same dancers go from the very technical and classical “Études” to banging their hands on the floor in “Cacti” shows that BB is a force to be reckoned with.

I’ll also put in a plug for their very awesome t-shirt designers. The tee for this show managed to encompass both beauty and edginess.

Pricked Tee

Though it’s hard to see in this picture it also has an Anne Brontë quote printed along the bottom of the design that fits right in with the theme: “But he who dares not grasp the thorn Should never crave the rose.” Love it!